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Cadbury news: Fans mad over controversial Bournville change – ‘I can’t eat it anymore’

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Cadbury has delighted chocolate fans over the years with its accidental vegan chocolate, Bournville. However, after customers noticed the addition of a new product to the ingredient list on its giant chocolate buttons, vegan customers have been left wondering if they can still eat the popular food item.

One person said: “Cadbury can you explain why after years of being a loved accidentally vegan product, you’ve decided to lace your products with milk powder?

“I can’t understand why you would do this? I’m honestly gutted and angry.”

Another said: “Just found out they add milk to the Bournville buttons and it’s ruined my day, I can’t eat it anymore.

“Just heard that Bournville buttons are no longer vegan and quite frankly that’s the worst news I’ve had all week,” commented another.

Cadbury told Express.co.uk: “There has been no change to the recipe; the change is in the way in which the risks of dairy cross contamination are being communicated on our packaging. 

“A recent audit revealed that traces of milk residues can still be found on manufacturing equipment despite intensive cleaning. 

“Therefore, in order to ensure that consumers are at minimum risk, our packaging has been changed and we now clearly state on pack that milk residues are present.

“There is no change to the risk to allergy-sufferers as the recipes and ingredients that go into the making of our products have not changed. 

“We are now clearly stating on pack that we cannot guarantee the absence of milk. 

“It is almost certainly going to be present – albeit at a low level. This packaging change ensures that consumers, especially milk allergy sufferers, are aware of the possibility and this represents a positive step in consumer communication.”

In other news, a new sugar and salt tax could be introduced in England as part of the Government’s National Food Strategy.

It comes after the Government has been urged to tackle the obesity crisis found across the country.

The tax could add one pence to the price of a packet of crisps and 7.5p to a small bar of chocolate.


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